Travel Safe

**Monroe County currently has numerous active

cases of COVID-19 and several fatalities.**

We will continue to monitor this situation as it develops and this page will be utilized to post updates. Monroe County is currently accommodating travelers differently during the current circumstance in order to do our part in protecting our community. For those who have decided to travel during this time, we are encouraging everyone to follow the travel best practices below from the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development. We want everyone to have a fun and

safe experience in Monroe County.

 

For the love of Monroe County, travel safe.

Visiting Monroe County

 When visiting Monroe County during this time, please keep the following in mind:

 

  • Visitation to nursing homes, retirement homes, long-term care or assisted-living facilities is not allowed. 

  • Tsali Notch Vineyard is only offering curbside sales until further notice (valid ID required) and the grounds are open. 

  • There are minimum group events/festivals taking place at this time. 

  • Several businesses across Monroe County are requiring the use of face masks/coverings for all customers.  

Please continue to check back with us for additional updates. 

COVID-19 Travel Best Practices

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and Tennessee Department of Health encourage potential travelers to prepare for COVID-19 and have issued the below best practices and information if you must travel:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you’ve been in a public place, after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.

  • If soap and water is not readily available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick and put distance between yourself and others if COVID-19 is spreading through your community.

  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or with your elbow.

  • Throw away used tissues then immediately wash or sanitize your hands.

  • If you are not sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.

  • Please stay home if you’re sick.

  • If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people when sharing a room or vehicle. If you are not able to wear a facemask, then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes; and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room.

 

The coronavirus does not target specific populations of racial or ethnic backgrounds.

CDC Considerations for Travel

Should I travel within the US?

 

CDC does not generally issue advisories or restrictions for travel within the United States. However, cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Crowded travel settings, like airports, may increase chances of getting COVID-19, if there are other travelers with coronavirus infection. There are several things you should consider when deciding whether it is safe for you to travel.

Things to consider before travel:

  • Is COVID-19 spreading in the area where you’re going?
    If COVID-19 is spreading at your destination, but not where you live, you may be more likely to get infected if you travel there than if you stay home. If you have questions about your destination, you should check your destination’s local health department website for more information.

  • Will you or your travel companion(s) be in close contact with others during your trip?
    Your risk of exposure to respiratory viruses like coronavirus may increase in crowded settings, particularly closed-in settings with little air circulation. This may include settings such as conferences, public events (like concerts and sporting events), religious gatherings, public spaces (like movie theatres and shopping malls), and public transportation (like buses, metro, trains).

  • Are you or your travel companion(s) more likely to get severe illness if you get COVID-19?
    People at higher risk for severe disease are older adults and people of any age with serious chronic medical conditions (such as heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes). CDC recommends that travelers at higher risk for COVID-19 complications avoid all cruise travel and nonessential air travel.

  • Do you have a plan for taking time off from work or school, in case you are told to stay home for 14 days for self-monitoring or if you get sick with COVID-19?
    If you have close contact with someone with COVID-19 during travel, you may be asked to stay home to self-monitor and avoid contact with others for up to 14 days after travel. If you become sick with COVID-19, you may be unable to go to work or school until you’re considered noninfectious. You will be asked to avoid contact with others (including being in public places) during this period of infectiousness.

  • Do you live with someone who is older or has a serious, chronic medical condition?
    If you get sick with COVID-19 upon your return from travel, your household contacts may be at risk of infection. Household contacts who are older adults or persons of any age with severe chronic medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

  • Is COVID-19 spreading where I live when I return from travel?
    Consider the risk of passing COVID-19 to others during travel, particularly if you will be in close contact with people who are older adults or have severe chronic health condition These people are at higher risk of getting very sick. If your symptoms are mild or you don’t have a fever, you may not realize you are infectious.

 

Depending on your unique circumstances, you may choose to delay or cancel your plans. If you do decide to travel, be sure to take steps to help prevent getting and spreading COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases during travel. For the most up-to-date COVID-19 travel information, visit CDC COVID-19 Travel page.